Tag Archives: old Lahore

Sonali Musjid

View on approaching Lahore from the west

Runjeet Singh’s Tomb, Lahore, Punjab 1863

Punjab Public Library, Lahore Pakistan 1880

Two Men Sleeping on the Street – Lahore 1946

“… prostitutes peeking out from the doorways of their brothel” – Lahore 1946

Man smoking a hooka pipe as others look on – Lahore 1946

 

Street Scenes of Lahore – 1946

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Conservation of Shalimar Garden

Among the World Heritage Sites in Pakistan, the Lahore Fort (Shahi Qila) and the Shalamar Garden have special significance; both, inscribed on the
World Heritage List1 in 1981 as a single site, represents the epitome of the
Mughal architecture of the 17th century. The palace gardens of the Lahore Fort
and the pleasure garden of Shalamar invoke the Mughal’s love for landscape
as an articulated space. The complex symbolic imagery based on the Islamic
concept of the Paradise Garden2, amalgamated with local traditions, were
the hallmark of the architectural vocabulary of the period. Built in 1641- 42 C.E. for Emperor Shah Jahan (1628- 1658), the Shalamar Garden, is located at a distance of about five kilometers North-East of the Walled City of Lahore and its citadel, the Lahore Fort.

Beginning with Akbar, each Mughal Emperor built his palaces in the citadel and
Shah Jahan contributed with his Quadrangle and its Diwan-e- Khas (Hall of Special Audience), the Khawab-Gah (Kings Sleeping Chambers), the Shah Burj and the exquisite Sheesh Mahal and that is where he stayed during his sojourn in Lahore. He would also attend to important business of the State at the gardens of Shalamar, where ceremonies were held and where the elite were honored through invitation. The Garden was also a favorite resting place in the Royal movements to and from Lahore. Click here to read complete report

Indian boys playing atop an old military cannon built in 1761 which stands on the grounds of the Jubilee Museum & Technical Institute, Prince Albert Memorial Museum – Lahore 1946


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High Court Lahore. The Mall. Circa 1900. Taken from the Anglican Cathedral Grounds

Lohari Gate of Lahore, A Rare Image.

A rare image of Lahori Gate, one of the 13 gates of Lahore. It was taken by an unknown photographer in 1900.

 

Posted by: Shiraz Hassan

 

 

 

Samadhi Maharaja Ranjit Singh


Photograph of the Samadhi of Ranjit Singh at Lahore, Pakistan, taken by George Craddock in the 1880s, part of the Bellew Collection of Architectural Views.  Lahore is the capital of Punjab province, is considered the cultural centre of Pakistan.

Posted by:  Shiraz Hassan

Revisions to the ‘facts’ on Mubarak Haveli of Lahore

M has sent this piece for Lahore Nama shedding light on the well-known Mubarak Haveli located in old Lahore. This piece was written in response to the information found on this blog. I am publishing this ‘correction’ of facts for the readers. No wonder there is not a single history but several narratives of the past. Raza Rumi

•    During the rule of Muhammad Shah, three amirs namely Bahadur Ali, Nadir Ali, and Babur Ali constructed a haveli in Mochi Gate area. Coinciding with its completion Bahadur Ali was blessed with a son and thus the haveli was named Mubarak Haveli. Prince Shah Shuja ul-Mulk was made to stay at this haveli by Ranjeet Singh, who later forced the prince to surrender Koh-i-Noor to him. Continue reading

CDGL to restore Old Lahore

Staff Report LAHORE: The City District Government Lahore (CDGL) has reiterated to revive the historic city of Lahore under the Lahore Beautification Master Plan initiated by Punjab Chief Minister (CM) Shahbaz Sharif.

Lahore Commissioner Khusro Pervaiz Khan stated on Wednesday that the government was planning to relocate the vegetable market situated near the Kot Lakhpat railway gate Continue reading

Painting prostitutes, Pakistani brushes off religious hard-liners

By Ivan Watson
CNN

It’s hot and sweaty in a rat-infested room in Lahore’s historic red light district, a neighborhood of narrow alleyways lined with brothels.

A barefoot, long-haired woman is gyrating and twirling on the carpet, to the beat of a four-man band whose drummer sweats profusely as he pounds out a furious rhythm.

The dancer, who only gives her first name, Beenish, is performing a kind of Pakistani belly-dance called the mujra.

Her harmonium player, a skinny bald man who squints through coke-bottle glasses, has been performing like this for the past 50 years. But he says the art form is dying out. Continue reading

Old Lahore, old books

Posted by Raza Rumi

Darwaish

I grew up in Androon Shehr (old city) of Lahore in the 1980s.

Most of my childhood and teenage years were spent in my Nana Jan’s house located at Lodge Road in Old Anarkali. It was an old but large house, left by a Hindu migrant family, located inside a narrow street of hundreds of years old neighborhood with Jain Mandir (when it existed) just two blocks away and Mall Road merely a ten minutes walk.

Nana used to tell us that Gayan Chand, the head of that Hindu family, spent three long years building this house and it was a strange twist of fate that finally when it got completed in 1947 and he was just about to move in, partition took place. Not only did he lose his newly built house but he also had to flee the city where his forefathers had lived for centuries. Just like Nana Continue reading

Lahore as in the 19th Century – Goulding’s recollection

Colonel H.R. Goulding was ADC to the King-Emperor T.H. Thornton, a distinguished British official, was secretary to the Punjab government in the 1860s

EXCERPTS found here:

First printed in 1860 for private circulation, these summaries of the history of Lahore were incorporated, in 1876, in a guidebook which was a joint piece of work by T.H. Thornton and J. Lockwood Kipling
H.R. Goulding writes about Old Lahore and the Mall:

It is of interest to recall that the beautiful Mall of which we are so justly proud and which is admittedly one of the finest public roads in Pakistan was first aligned in 1851 by Lieut-Colonel Napier, the Civil Engineer, who described it as “a direct road from Anarkali to Mian Mir.” He submitted alternative estimates for its construction, one for Rs12,544 and the other for Rs10,428. The former was for kankar throughout, the latter for an under layer of bricks with a kankar surface. Colonel Napier thought that the cheaper design would be sufficiently durable, but, in transmitting both estimates to the government of India, the Board of Administration remarked that they thought that as this road would be “the great thoroughfare not only with Anarkali but also with the city,” it would be more economical in the long run to sanction the higher estimate.

The Government of India, however, accepted Colonel Napier’s opinion and sanctioned, in April, 1851, the lower estimate. No noticeable alteration either in alignment of width seems to have been made till Sir Ganga Ram was Executive Engineer in charge of the Lahore Provincial Division, and extensive improvements were carried out in the sections east of the Post Office crossing. Later still the whole length of the Mall was remodelled on its present lines under the personal supervision of the late Mr DuCune Smythe, Chief Engineer, who, in turn, was supervised by the then Lieutenant-Governor, Sir Charles Rivaz. It was nothing unusual to meet, on a winter’s morning, these two high officials in earnest consultation by the roadside. On one occasion the writer saw the chief Engineer kneeling on the ground with a measuring tape in his hands, while on another the Lieutenant-Governor, who never allowed the felling of a tree if it could possibly be avoided, was personally superintending the marking of certain roadside trees which had to come down when the Mall was being realigned and widened opposite the Mayo School of Art. Continue reading

Nau Nihal Singhs Haveli Lahore

Nau Nihal Singhs Haveli Lahore, originally uploaded by asmlondon.

Nau Nihal Singhs Haveli Lahore is a landmark. It has several wall paintings representative of the Sikh period. The exterior has been whitewashed for ‘maintenance’.

More photos here at Chitarkar webiste - they show the details and the magic of this structure..

Picture courtesy Asmlondon on Flickr

Iqbal Hussain – Lahore’s controversial artist

Iqbal Hussain from Lahore is one of the finest painters we have. Most of his paintings depict women from the Heera Mandi (literally the diamond market)- or the centuries old red-light district. I found the above image on the Internet today. The news-item referred to Iqbal’s advocacy through his powerful art works:

..Others, who have emerged as spokespersons for the women of Heera Mandi, including leading artist Iqbal Hussain, whose own mother was a sex worker, emphasise their “lack of empowerment, exploitation and helplessness”.

His works convey all of these emotions and bring to life extraordinary characters who are often neglected or spurned by the hypocritical culture of Pakistan.

Endnote from here:

Being termed a controversial painter in Pakistan, Iqbal’s subjects sometimes tend to shock “puritan painters”, but Iqbal follows his own visions and continues to paint his unconventional and radically innovative paintings. He enjoys a great reputation as an artist in the international art world. His paintings have been requested by Jordanian Princess Wijdan Ali for the Jordanian Gallery of Fine Arts. His were the only ones selected for Unesco Headquarters Prize in 1995, Paris. In 1998, one of his paintings was auctioned at the Sotheby’s Auction House in London.

More on Iqbal Hussain here