Category Archives: sculpture

minorities artwork finds esteem in Lahore

Rashmi Talwar writes on how the minorities artwork finds esteem in Lahore






Ancient artwork finds a semblance of esteem at Cooco’s Den in Lahore

Nothing surprises you more than finding a rich repository of Hindu, Buddhist, Jain and Christian ancient artifacts in the heart of Lahore, Pakistan. Continue reading

Lahore: NCA students exhibit work on Iqbal’s vision

Staff Report

LAHORE: Students of the National College of Arts (NCA) on Thursday exhibited their work based on Allama Iqbal’s verse ‘Learn to Think and See in New Ways’ at Zahoorul Akhlaq Gallery.

The exhibition was titled ‘Transformation’, and was inaugurated by The Friday Times publisher Jugnu Mohsin. A large number of students turned, and many of them had worked together on the project. The work included paintings, sculptures and short documentaries.

Individual approaches to a uniform theme – based on Iqbal’s philosophy – were displayed at the exhibition. An art piece ‘Kaukab-e-Qismat-e-Imkaan’ by 4th-year student Adeel Ahmad Zafar and 3rd-year student Dua Abbas Rizvi spoke volumes about transformation. The material used included wood, pen and ink, which made it quite unique.

Student Ejaz Saeed’s sculpture dealt with intoxication. The statue was gilded with cigarettes, tablets and syringes. Continue reading

Alfred Woolner


Alfred Woolner

Originally uploaded by yasir nisar

“Alfred Woolner was the vice chancellor of the Punjab University from 1928 to 1936. His is the only statue left of many that were positioned in front of prominent buildings during the British Raj in a wave of imperialistic civic zeal. Now, with the title of ‘colony’ no longer hanging over our heads, we are in a better position to appreciate the aesthetic value and historical importance of these effigies. That is if it’s not too late.

The statues were a significant part of my youth,” said Sajjid Abbas, a septuagenarian Lahori who knows the city like the back of his hand. “I would often walk down The Mall and take photographs of these beautiful sculptures because I knew that they would disappear one day.” There were a total of ten such statues, each narrating the grandeur and the might of British rule, said Mr Abbas, taking a walk down memory lane and relating the history of each of the sculptures. The first on Mr Abbas’s list of these “emblems of British authority” is the bronze statue of Queen Victoria that was placed in the pavilion of the assembly chambers.

Read more here: http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_6-8-2004_pg7_27

Lahore: Public Sculptures from the Raj

Raza Rumi 

Sheraz from Islamabad has contributed this amazing account of Lahore’s eclectic past. The influence of the British rulers resulted in erection of sculptures at public places, not an uncommon practice in the colonies. Most of these relics of the past are no more. Some have been conserved while others were removed.

Sheraz writes

“The statue of Lala Lajpat Rai (1865-1928), who, while leading a procession with Pandit Madan Mohan Malaviya to demonstrate against the Simon Commission, faced brutal baton charge and died of fatal injuries on November 17, 1928, was somewhere in the vicinity of Kim’s Gun or zamazama – the famous cannon on the Mall, Lahore. This statue is no more there.

Another statue in this area was of Sir Ganga Ram, who gave many beautiful landmarks to the city of Lahore. What happened to this statue has been narrated by Saadat Hassan Manto, the celebrated Urdu short story writer, in one of his short stories on the frenzy of communal riots of 1947. Manto writes that an inflamed mob in Lahore, after attacking a Hindu mohalla, ‘turned to attacking the statue of Sir Ganga Ram, the Hindu philanthropist. They first pelted the statue with stones; then smothered its face with coal tar. Then a man made a garland of old shoes climbed up to put it round the neck of the statue. The police arrived and opened fire. Among the injured were the fellow with the garland of old shoes. As he fell, the mob shouted: “Let us rush him to Sir Ganga Ram Hospital.”

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