Tag Archives: code

Kinnaird College Lahore imposes ban on jeans after threats

Raza Rumi

Lahore’s premier institution for women’s higher education is also under threat. What a shame that a college that has always been a symbol of modernity, enlightenment and culture is now facing the perils of growing extremism in the city. How sad – but we need to resist this. It is understandable that the college authorities want to safeguard the security of students  but the civil society and the secular parties must not accept this nonsense. The state has to do what it is mandated under the Constitution. The news report below sums it all:

The Kinnaird College (KC) administration has banned the students from wearing jeans or other tight dresses in the wake of possible terrorist threats. The college has imposed a strict dress code that only allows students to wear Eastern dresses such as shalwar qameez or loose trousers. Dupatas have been made mandatory. Continue reading

Lahore: The writing on the wall

Ayeda Naqvi (courtesy Daily Times)

Lahore has been ruled by any number of any would-be emperors. Lahore has survived. The emperors have faded. Those who are remembered are remembered for their deeds, not their billboards

Driving down the streets of Lahore, a few days ago, I was struck by an unusual sight. On the wall of a canal underpass, in red, somebody had scribbled “I love you”. There was a heart around the words. So struck was I by this sight that I nearly crashed my car.

You see the past few months I have become accustomed to a very different type of graffiti — vandalism in the name of electioneering. From mammoth-sized billboards with candidates’ faces to political slogans painted on walls, Lahore was “sprayed” by the PMLQ in much the same way that animals mark their territory.

No corner of our city was spared. Everywhere we turned, we were assaulted by these large and vulgar displays. Lahore took on an eerie feel as even beggars’ wheelchairs sported logos. Everywhere you looked, Big Brother was watching you back.

Some people were so disgusted they simply refused to vote. Others were more pragmatic. As a Canal Park shop-keeper said, “We will take their cheques and eat their food but we will not vote for them.” The response was loud and clear: our loyalties are not for sale. No amount of money spent on television advertisements or street campaigns can buy our votes. Continue reading