Tag Archives: Lahore Nama

Urban rehabilitation: The rebirth of Lahore’s Gali Surjan Singh

An exciting report has been published on The Express Tribune about the renovation of Surjan Singh Street by the Punjab Govt with the help of Aga Khan Trust for Culture and World bank. Walled street is a gift of our ancestors with rich heritage to be proud of. We hope more such projects start and preserve this invaluable heritage.

Plaque of the renovated lane fixed next to an old lamp. A view of the street from the Delhi Gate. Residents of Surjan Singh Gali sip tea in their lane. PHOTO: EXPRESS TRIBUNE/HASSAN NAQVI

Plaque of the renovated lane fixed next to an old lamp. A view of the street from the Delhi Gate. Residents of Surjan Singh Gali sip tea in their lane. PHOTO: EXPRESS TRIBUNE/HASSAN NAQVI

Lahore: Located inside the Walled City’s Delhi Gate, Gali Surjan Singh is home to 13 residences. This week, conservation work on these homes and in the area received an ‘honourable mention’ from the UNESCO Asia-Pacific Awards for Cultural Heritage Conservation for “efforts of private individuals and organisations that have successfully restored and conserved structures and buildings of heritage value”.
The Gali Surjan Singh project includes a restoration of heritage architecture, replacement of infrastructure and services, including underground telecommunications, electricity, gas, water and sewerage. A total of 23 houses have been restored as part of the project, 13 of which were fully restored, and encroachments removed. Approximately Rs20 million was spent in the restoration of these 13 homes.
Gali Surjan Singh is named after Hakim Surjan Singh and it is believed that it dates back to the period of Maharaja Ranjeet Singh in 1849. In 2007, the Punjab government received financial support from the World Bank and technical and financial assistance from the Aga Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC) in order to begin a project of urban rehabilitation here that took into consideration the area’s historic nature and the lives of current residents. Continue reading

Jahangir’s Tomb, Lahore

The tomb of Emperor Jahangir who ruled India 1605-1027, is another jewel in the crown of Mughal architecture. The tomb is situated in Lahore, in Noor Jahan’s old pleasure garden known as Dilkusha Garden. The mausoleum is located at Shahdara on the banks of the Ravi, three miles northwest of the city. in the centre of which stands the magnificent sepulcher of Jahangir, considered by some to be the “finest ornament of Lahore,” and the “most magnificent edifice in the subcontinent after the Taj and the Qutub.”
The combination of red Sikri stone and white marble, an arrangement echoing Humayun’s tomb in Delhi, and a rare treat for Lahore not least for its intricate inlay, is impressive in its finesse and sophistication. Where the external expression is restrained in its dignified simplicity, internally decorative surfaces present you the best of tile mosaic and fresco that made Lahore famous in the whole of the Mughal Empire.
Following are some photos of the tomb “tweeted” by our twitter handle @lahorenama

 

Note: Info credit “ualberta” website, Photos credit “Kasim Osmani”.

JAHAN E JAHANARA

JAHAN E JAHANARA  is a cultural center for children, established in an oasis of historical trees, a bird sanctuary within a century old building, It is an island where children can acquire that essential but rare experience of their cultural heritage; it is an opportunity for them to explore their creative potential in a  systematic manner under expert guidance. At the core of Jahan e JahanAra is a comittment to revive social and artistic values to engender change.

This is a labour of love for Sheherezade Alam who is the moving force behind this new initiative. Alam studied art and design at the National College of Art Lahore. She did post graduate studies from the West Surrey College of Art and Design, UK.  Her intimacy with clay, beginning in the early 1970’s made her Pakistan’s first female studio potter, and has seen her travel and work alongside with some of the most acclaimed twentieth century potters in Europe, Asia, US, and Canada. In 2000, she established LAAL, an artists collective, whose mission is to bring cultural and heritage education to young children. The Jahan e JahanAra, Center for Traditional Arts, is an attempt to contribute/ share this passion to/ with the children of Lahore. Continue reading

Lahore Nama has a new dynamic author

Lahore Nama proudly announces its new author/editor Rafay Alam who is an:

  • Advocate of the Pakistani High Courts
  • Environmental Activist
  • Columnist
  • Avid bicyclist
  • Lahori

Welcome on board, Rafay…

Raza Rumi

Lahore Nama is getting noticed

Lahore Nama is getting some attention. This is encouraging as the Lahoris across the globe share my sentiments about this inimitable city.. (Raza Rumi)

This is what Koonj had to say in her post entitled A treasure chest for Lahore-lovers:

Thanks to Baraka, a fellow nostalgic Lahorite, I have found Lahore Nama. The blog is a treasure-chest of jewels for those who love the old, old and very, very modern city of Lahore. Lahore is where I spent most of my life. It is one of the largest cities in Pakistan, just on the border to India, and the capital city of Punjab province. The river Ravi runs through it (or one should use the past tense, given the state of the river), and it is the scene of tremendous academic, religious, literary and cultural activity.

I am a denizen of the city – my father, who was born and raised there, describes himself as a “Lahore ka keera” (literally, a bug of Lahore, which means one who knows the city like the back of his hand). I still yearn for it everyday, and whenever I return, I discover secrets and jewels tucked away in its dusty streets and along its willow-lined canal banks. Mughal monuments, Sufi shrines, colonial architecture, the lively world of the inner city and the oh-so-chic world of the upper-classes – Lahore has everything.